Thanksgiving For Animals

Come celebrate Thanksgiving for Animals! Join us on Sunday, November 26 from 11am-2pm at SASHA Farm, where we’ll be honoring turkeys who represent everything there is to be thankful for—love, peace, and compassion! We’ll be remembering all the individual turkeys who lost their lives this year by serving our own special turkey gals a pumpkin pie memorial feast! This is a great chance to get a private tour of the farm, meet the animals and like-minded people, and support the sanctuary.

Serving free coffee and cider! There will also be a vegan bake sale where you’ll be able to buy delicious vegan donuts, pie, and other treats to go with your coffee or cider. Also for sale will be SASHA Farm merchandise. We request that you bring cash or checks instead of credit cards if you can.

Minimum donation $20 for adults, $10 for kids, free for 5 and under. Proceeds will be used for winter expenses and veterinary bills.

You can also check out this event on our facebook page, here. Feel free to contact us for more information at info@sashafarm.org. We hope to see you this Sunday! Have a happy Thanksgiving!

And The Winner Is . . .

. . The SASHA Farm Turkeys!

Thank you to everyone who sponsored one of our turkeys for Thanksgiving.  It is truly heartwarming to see how many people care and want to contribute to their well-being.  A special thanks to our drawing winner, Stephanie Church, who donated her winnings to the sanctuary.

This season we are truly thankful for all our generous friends who help keep SASHA going.  You give us so much hope for the future.

Have a very happy and compassionate Thanksgiving.

All Because of You!

SASHA Farm‘s annual benefit and auction is our largest fundraiser each year. The funds raised at this event allow us to continue providing food, shelter, and medical care to animals who rarely received these necessities until they became SASHA Farm residents.

Each year, our banquet attendees and those who donate to the auction really make this fundraiser a success for the SASHA animal residents, and this year’s October 14th benefit was no exception.  In addition, on October 28, 2017, we celebrated 16 years of rescuing animals and providing animal welfare education as a nonprofit.  A big “THANK YOU!” goes to ALL who support SASHA Farm and its residents. We couldn’t do this without YOU!

Please help us thank our 2017 auction donors by recognizing their contributions, and help support them with your patronage.

Amy Bell

Anita Marcott

Anita Mishra

Audrey Rappe

Bev Steffens

Brece Clark (speaker, Ethical Choices Program)

Cam Awesome (Emcee and speaker)

Cassie Pietron

Chitra Bala

Christina Fahlsing

Coach Carleigh – Vegan Wellness

Debra Levantrosser

Eric Schultz

Grace Taylor

Greg Scherban Photography

Janet Christian

Janice Cantelon

Jason Derry – Oakenday Press

Kathryn Benedict –Anat Baniel Method Sessions, Chelsea, Michigan

Linda Parr

Loryn Benacquisto

Matt Cash

Ramesh Dedhia

Renee Quinn

Russ Hagy – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Sandi Giardini

Shimmy Shack – Michigan

Sonja Steis –Thrive Vegan Cooking – Grosse Pointe Woods, Michigan

Vedge Café  – Ann Arbor, Michigan

A Very Special Day at SASHA Farm!

Thank you to all who came to SASHA Farm Animal Sanctuary on Sunday, October 22 to spend time with the Jersey 5 and all the other residents. First, we met the babies in the small pasture area outside their living quarters, and all our visitors had a delightful time cuddling the sweet babies. But when we opened the gate and they ran free in the larger pasture adjoining FOR THE VERY FIRST TIME IN THEIR LIVES, it was a wondrous sight to behold – and a very special day for all who witnessed the Jersey 5 running and jumping with joy! Check out this movie on our Facebook page by clicking HERE.

We appreciate your support, and the money raised will go toward helping the Jersey 5 receive ongoing medical care. If you have pictures and videos of the event that you would like to share with us and all our supporters, please email them to socialmedia@sashafarm.org. For larger files, please send an email to socialmedia@sashafarm.org and we will be happy to provide alternate information.

Cat Lovers Needed!

IMG_7441SASHA Farm would love to have your help caring for 12 sweet cats in our cat barn.  Shifts are once a week for a minimum of 2 hours, but we would love to have you stay longer!  Our volunteers clean, wash floors, do laundry, scoop litter, and feed the cat residents.

Purrs and snuggles are complimentary!

Please email Darcy at darcyrocks@yahoo.com or Lynn at lynxdonell@aol.com for more information.

*Volunteers must be 18 years of age.*

** As much as we would love to take more cats, our cat barn is full so we are unable to accept cats for rescue at this time. **

Supporting REAL Animal Sanctuaries

A bear at Summer Wind Farms (c) PETA

In 2017, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) released an undercover investigation into Summer Wind Farms, a so-called animal sanctuary in Brown City, Michigan. During their investigation, PETA found animals living in cramped, filthy enclosures, others who were denied veterinary care and still more who were exhibiting chronic psychological distress.

In 2016, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) filed a formal legal complaint against the “sanctuary” arguing that they failed to meet even minimal animal welfare standards including a failure to handle animals as carefully as possible, a failure to provide animals proper medical care and a failure to provide animals a clean or safe shelter including in inclement weather. Between 2012-2016, the USDA alleges that Summer Wind Farms violated the Animal Welfare Act over 200 times.

PETA’s investigation raises important questions about what it means to be an “animal sanctuary” and which animal organizations should be receiving your support.

There are hundreds of animal organizations and facilities across the United States that claim to be “sanctuaries” for exotic, domestic or farmed animals. Unfortunately, many of these “sanctuaries” would more aptly be called roadside zoos or even hoarding situations where animals are warehoused and put on display for overly trusting tourists. Visiting these types of places, which buy, breed or keep animals for profit, or even for seemingly well-intentioned purposes, unfortunately support the animals’ continued confinement and suffering.

Before attending, donating, sharing their social media posts or in other ways supporting a “sanctuary,” you should ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is the organization a non-profit? If so, check that they’re a registered charity with the government (you can do that here). While this doesn’t guarantee that they’re a bona fide sanctuary, it is a good indication of their motives for keeping animals.
  • Does this organization buy, sell or breed animals? Real sanctuaries never breed animals. While sometimes sanctuaries are able to rescue animals as babies or pregnant moms who give birth to babies shortly after their arrival, baby animals at any sanctuary should generally be a red flag.
  • How are visitors allowed to interact with animals at the facility? Most legitimate sanctuaries have limits on how and when people can visit and interact with their animal residents. Sanctuaries should never encourage animals to perform “tricks” for visitors, or allow visitors to feed them junk food or interact with scared or aggressive animals. Visitors should never be allowed to hand-feed, hold, or touch dangerous animals like tigers and bears.
  • Along these lines, you should ask yourself how the animals look. Do they look healthy or ill? Do they look happy or stressed? If they look ill or stressed, be sure to ask why. Many sanctuaries take animals who have been abused or neglected and many animals come to sanctuaries with previously untreated medical issues. Sanctuaries truly concerned about animal welfare should be providing all ill animals with appropriate medical care and should be willing to discuss that care with the public.
  • Are the animals living in spacious, clean and enriching enclosures? Or are they cramped, dirty and barren? Animals living at genuine sanctuaries should live in groups with space to roam, explore, play and relax free of trash, debris and excessive muck and waste.

Visiting or donating to pseudo-sanctuaries only perpetuates the suffering of the animals kept there. And sharing their pictures or other posts on social media only serves to legitimize them and increase their reach to more unsuspecting animal lovers. If you see an animal in distress at one of these facilities, please contact your local humane society or animal control. You can find more tips on helping animals suffering from abuse or neglect here.

Please, only visit or support real sanctuaries truly committed to the care of their animal residents and to supporting the rights of animals.

Thank You for Making the Spring Social a Success!

Sunday, May 21st was our annual Spring Social Fundraiser and Open House, a time for SASHA members and supporters to visit and tour the sanctuary, meet the animal residents, and socialize with others interested in animal rights and plant-based living. This year over 500 members and supporters came out for the Social, helping to raise much-needed funds for the animals who live at SASHA.

If you missed the Spring Social, fear not, we’re having public tours at the Sanctuary on June 18th, July 16th, and September 17th. All tours are on a Sunday from 11 am until approximately 2 pm and are $10 per person. To RSVP, please email Bob at bob@sashafarm.org.

And don’t forget about our annual Humane Fair on Sunday, August 13th. The Humane Fair will include guided tours, a catered vegan lunch and informational booths staffed by area animal groups. It’s a great opportunity to learn about SASHA, meet the animal residents, and learn more about animal rights and local groups working towards humane reforms for animals in Michigan and beyond. You can find more information about the Humane Fair, as it becomes available, on our website and Facebook page.

Should people have “backyard chickens?” It’s Complicated.

Keeping chickens and other farmed animals, such as pot-bellied pigs, has become increasingly popular over the past few decades. But unfortunately, purchasing these animals on a whim has led to a homelessness crisis for them, meaning many are abandoned, neglected, abused or killed because of a lack of homes.

Oftentimes, well-intentioned people purchase chickens for their companionship, eggs, or even so-called “humane meat.”

Humane societies and sanctuaries, including SASHA, are constantly inundated with requests to take chickens formerly kept as pets. The need for safe and humane homes for one-time backyard chickens is overwhelming and this crisis begs the question, should people be buying and keeping chickens in their backyards?

Chickens are smart, curious animals who enjoy spending their time in groups perching and roosting in trees and straw, rooting in dirt and grasses and exploring their surroundings. Chickens have their own languages and unique likes, dislikes and personalities.

Dozens of chickens live at SASHA including some rescued from factory farms and others from a cock fighting operation.

Unfortunately, many of the chickens destined to be kept as pets are purchased from cruel factory farms. These mail order chickens are raised in intensive confinement and shipped far distances in boxes like things rather than thinking, feeling beings.

Additionally, many communities prohibit or regulate the keeping of chickens, limiting the size of a flock or the types of chickens someone can keep. Many cities prohibit the keeping of roosters, which means many are summarily killed at the hatcheries when they’re born or else abandoned or killed when they’re older. Many would-be chicken keepers scramble to place roosters because the animals were missexed and inadvertently purchased.

Humane societies and animal control agencies are often ill-equipped to help those mistakenly keeping chickens or roosters illegally or those who are no longer able to care for them. In order to provide the best quality of life possible for the chickens and roosters they already have, many sanctuaries, including SASHA, are unable to take in new chickens. This means that for those who rush into buying chickens, there is little help for them if they run into problems.

Animal sanctuaries, including United Poultry Concerns (UPC), encourage would-be chicken keepers to do their research and make sure they’re up to the task. Chickens require safe, clean, predator-protected coops and lots of space to roam and explore. You should also research the laws regarding keeping chickens and roosters where you live and always adopt, never buy, chickens.

You can find more information on the practical and ethical issues of keeping chickens and best practices for their care on UPC’s website.